Sep
11
2012
0

Snowstorm In Columbia

Montreal Sound – Snowstorm in Columbia

More percussion, this time from Canada, made in 1977.

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Sep
11
2012
0

The Animals

Jan Hammer – The Animals

A percussion track from an unlikely source. In the picture Sirpa Lane (Salo), a dead-from-Aids trash queen and my country’s main contribution to genre film history. Sirpa was discovered by David Hamilton and then recruited by Roger Vadim to star in his pretentious arthouse sleazebomb La Jeune Fille Assassinée in 1974. The woman really arrived the following year with Walerian Borowczyk’s Le Bete: see Sirpa get raped by a bear-like creature and then give the thing a handjob in messy gushing detail! After this it was all uphill for her with titles like Mario Caino’s naziploitation classic La Svastica Nel Ventre/The Living Nightmare, Joe D’Amato’s Papaya Dei Caraibi/Papaya The Love Goddess Of The Cannibals and stuff like Malabestia and La Bestia Nello Spazio/The Beast In Space.

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Sep
10
2012
0

L’amour à la bouche

Rolf Spaar & Yann Tregger – L’amour à la bouche (1974)

Thunderous soundtrack for a softcore flick.

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Sep
09
2012
0

Webradio Player Applet fixed

The player is now fixed and will work with Java 7.

(more…)

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Sep
09
2012
0

Camito Real

Urban Hansson – Camito Real

Made in some Swedish jungle sometime during the seventies.

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Sep
09
2012
2

D Comme Disco

Original Trompette D’or – D Comme Disco

France 1978. Let’s repeat what Pablo Picasso said, good taste is the arch enemy of all creativity.

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Sep
09
2012
2

Allô à l’OVNI

Ringo – Allô à L’OVNI (1979)

Just for fun, so don’t throw stones at me.

The lyrics are a perfect example of non-sense techno mumbo-jumbo, what would you expect from Ringo anyway.

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Sep
07
2012
0

From Shanghai to ShangHigher-Mix

Tonight, 20:00 UTC:
The Robot Scientists

“From Shanghai to ShangHigher-Mix”

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Sep
07
2012
0

The Longest Possible From Bob

The longest possible from Bob

Bob is Bob Crewe, a solo act and a producer who first hit big with the swinging bachelor pad lounge classic Music to Watch Girls By in 1966. In 1968 he composed An Angel is Love and other tracks for the Barbarella soundtrack. During the mid-70s Bob started doing disco like everybody else, first for Disco Tex & The Sex-O-Lettes ( Get Dancin’ & I Wanna Dance With Choo ). A year later in 1976 he released an album under the moniker B.C.G. The Bob Crewe Generation. The sound is overblown cabaret disco to the max but trust Bob to get it right. Along with the early Ritchie Family albums, Begin The Beguine by Johnny Mathis and My Sweet Summer Suite by the Love Unlimited Orchestra, this is as good as that stuff gets.

Here we have three of the main titles in a mix. In 1976 nothing but the absolute longest versions of anything would do on American dancefloors. The first tune Cherry Boy is from the album as that’s the only version there is – with lyrics like “your ass is your ticket to paradise, better be ready to pay the price, it’s so nice so nice”. Street Talk is the full 9’22” 12-inch version. Menage A Trois is also the long 12″ one clocking 5’05”.

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Sep
07
2012
0

Dancing Robot


Teddy Dan & The World Champions – Dancing Robot (1979)

Thanks to Spaziale

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Sep
07
2012
0
Sep
06
2012
1

Trip

Thierry Meyer – Trip (1981)

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Sep
06
2012
2

Disco After Death Mix

Jussi Kantonen – Disco After Death Mix

What happens after Azul Y Negro’s Hertzanfall/Infarcto? This is when La Santa Muerte, Lady of the Land of the Dead, will come and grab you by the hair. You will dance together first to a track from the Milkyways album, then to stuff like Pazuzu by Ennio Morricone, the very long and impossibly grand Proxima Centauri by I Signori Della Galassia, Como Te Quiero by Barbados Climax, Crazy People by Romy Haag, Piritta’s Ota (Take) and more.

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Sep
05
2012
1

Not Easy (To Love)

Deluge – Not Easy (To Love)

Slow motion disco doesn’t get much better than this 7″ by a Dutch group Deluge (1978).

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Sep
04
2012
0

The Other Side

 

Jeff Phillips – The Other Side

Always remember to listen to the other side. This hypnotic groove is on the flip of Superman 7″.

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Sep
03
2012
0

Elvin Shaad

Elvin Shaad – I Want Loving

Recorded in France, mixed by Savarese in the US, out in Italy on Goody label in 1978.

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Sep
02
2012
0

Please Love Me Again

Mat Camison & Pierre-Alain Dahan – Please Love Me Again (1975)

Mat Camison, a long time Telemusic songwriter – just like P.-A. Dahan, is also part of Performance, along with Pierre Bachelet. Pierre Alain Dahan is a member of the all-mighty dream team Dahan, Chantereau, Pezin and Mallia, and shouldn’t be introduced anymore BTW.

This track has been released to the US market under the name VIP Connection – Please love me again, but credited to the whole Arpadys squad this time.

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Sep
02
2012
3

Camp Cosmic 2012 Report Lineup

Get ready for the two long Camp Cosmic report nights!

Tune in to the webradio and feel like you are experiencing it first hand with the live recordings. Unfortunately, the impressive setting and the magnificent Swedish forest couldn’t make the cut, but I’m sure you’ll get a glimpse of the ethereal atmosphere that was going on during those nights anyway.

Picture courtesy of Jonas Asp

All DJ sets couldn’t be recorded so I apologize in advance. Kudos to Albion, Karolina and the organizers. Thank you as well to all party-goers and DJs that were there and made the show.

The Robot Scientists’ Spaced Out Disco Session will kick off the party on Friday 20:00 UTC.

Friday September 7
21:00 – 22:00 Karol (SE)
22:00 – 00:00 Rob ‘n’ Zoopsie (BE)
00:00 – 03:00 Albion (SE)
Saturday September 8
21:00 – 22:00 Vomatron & Nixxon (DK)
22:00 – 00:00 Carlo Simula (IT)
00:00 – 01:00 Jussi Kantonen (FI)
01:00 – 02:00 Jussi Kantonen & Carlo Simula (back to back)
02:00 – 03:00 SpAceLex (DE)

All times are UTC and approximate.

What will sadly not be part of the broadcast:

Mystic Rock going mad

P.S. Most DJ sets won’t be available for download afterward, now you know.

P.P.S. I won’t have the time to fix the player applet for Friday, if you use Java 7 then either revert back to Java 5 or 6, log in to the Shampoo platform (http://radio.ddcr.biz/), or use the “listen with your player” link.

Written by:   | Filed in: Parties
Sep
01
2012
0
Aug
30
2012
3

The Päivi Interview

We are thrilled to present the Overfitting interview of the reigning Queen of Finnish Disco Exotica, Päivi Kautto-Niemi alias Päivi. In this part one of the special we got the text and a couple of video clips. There’ll be more exclusive music later.

Jussi: I was just listening to the biggie Kuuma Heinäkuu / Hot July from 1984. Before we actually go on one quick question about the synths. What kind of machines did your band use back in the day?

Päivi: The Yamaha X7s became available In the middle of the disco heyday and they revolutionized the scene. The machines were used a lot as they could reproduce sounds of an orchestra. One objective was to imitate the strings. The results turned out somewhat plastic and robotic but then again, this was actually the desired effect. If we wanted some brass, a single “instrument” would still come across as rather horrible but when you built a whole section with trumpets and so on it all started to acquire a very interesting sound. Real drums were still employed a lot but electronic equivalents hit the stores around that same time too, like those from Simmons. The drummer in my band got himself one of those in red to serve as the second kit, he was in fact among the first to do get them in the country.

Drum machines became more and more widely used both in the studios and during live gigs. Maintaining the tempo is essential in disco as danceability is all-important. Back in the day 120 was the most common bpm whereas they’re faster now – probably due to the overall more hectic vibe of everything these days. Maybe the current video styles have something to do with it as well.

The drum patterns were basic and effective with bass drum laying down the four-on-the-floor and with hi-hats zipped on the twos and the fours. Add an octave bass and voilá: the disco beat.

Jussi: Okay, going back to the roots now. You not only were there to experience the disco phenomenon during it’s peak era but you also actually contributed to the sound by making records. Do you personally enjoy disco and if you do, what does the word mean to you?

Päivi: Yes I’m part of the original disco generation. I remember well when they brought a copy of the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack to the recording company I worked for. I heard it first at a party there and ever since, disco has been my thing. And, I got to contribute to the sound, what could be cooler than that? While I was a student I went dancing in the clubs and I recall seeing my picture all along the streets, dancing with a friend of mine – someone had taken a photo without my knowledge and used it for a poster.

Jussi: You cut your teeth on Sunny, originally Boney M’s version of the Bobby Hebb hit. The breakthrough came with Liljankukka (Lily Flower), a track with a full, Ritchie Family-style orchestral arrangement. What were these sessions like, did you sing over a pre-recorded backtrack? Did they give any instructions how to deliver the tune?

Päivi: I still think Sunny is a fine disco track. I remember one time when it gave me a real frisson. I was at a gym dancing and the first tune we got was Sunny. I was electrified with the first bars of the intro and whispered to my friend with pride that I actually recorded this in Finnish. The feeling overcomes me every time I perform Sunny during my gigs. However it’s the Lily Flower tune that means something even more special and grand to me. I’m happy to have interpreted it and I’ll never tire singing it no matter how often. Everyone thinks the arrangement is excellent even though it was tricky to pull off, especially for the string section. At that session we had the best available violinists, a total of eight of them if I remember right. I was present some of the time when they were laying down the instrumentation but the actual singing was done later over pre-recorded tracks. The arranger guided me thru it but can’t recall what actual dos and donts he gave me for my interpretation. I do remember me trying out the song at home and feeling this one is going to end up something new and special.

Jussi: What was it like hearing your voice blast out thru the speakers in clubs? Did you dance to your records? The forever-outrageous Grace Jones blurted out back in the day that she only danced to her own stuff…

Päivi: Well yes, I was there when they played my music and to be honest I did dance. I do prefer getting down to records made by others though – a certain Finnish sense of modesty perhaps, here?

Jussi: You also recorded Johnny Guitar. Even though that was not done disco like the Sling track it’s got the Spanish guitar vibe, just like your version of the Judy Cheeks classic Mellow Lovin’ called Suoraan Suoneen (A Shock To The System). Do you remember who was it that chose these titles for you?

Päivi: Johnny Guitar is such a special song, it sounds good arranged any which way. Whatever the frame the guitars got to be in there though. I do perform the tune still but usually as a slow song. I remember when I first heard Mellow Lovin’. The company gave me a copy and enough time to get inside the song, well before they made the instrumental backtrack for the Finnish version. I liked the tune a lot and thought that this calls for a true Diva Delivery and that’s the way I deal with it, too. Often I also get into that whole larger-than-life act during my gigs as well, already when introducing the song. I usually add that hey, have had a few years to tweak this thing to perfection, too.

People do their Karaoke versions of Suoraan Suoneen but I have to say that song is a bit of a challenge. Still get lot of requests for it while gigging and I do like the tune. It’s never off the radio for a long time, either.

Often when I heard something I did think whether it would be a tune for me. If I remember right it was Kim Kuusi and Esa Nieminen who picked the titles, and as an artist in the making I did trust their judgement.

Jussi: By 1978 disco had become a musical form in it’s own right. You recorded Vie Paratiisin, a version of Kelly Marie’s Take Me To Paradise that now works way better than the original, with a more exotic feel. A year later you did the legendary Asha Puthli’s Lay A Little Love, as Leikitään Vain (Let’s Play, Alright). However, Pakoon (Running Away) was no longer a cover song. The sublime Sillä Siisti (That’s it) was another wholly homegrown one. Was there ever talk of doing English versions of these?

Päivi: Lay A Little Love is another one I always liked for some reason though I never included it in my repertoire while gigging. Something to do with the arrangements, probably. Pakoon/Running Away was composed by Esa Nieminen and had lyrics by Pertsa Reponen. That’s the one that landed me with a number three spot at some competition but in fact the record was played as much on the radio as the winning entry. Right about that time I recorded the Sillä Siisti/That’s It track that has the intro which filled the floor in a flash. I performed the tune in Soul in South Korea too, and Frank Robson translated the lyrics into English. During that period nobody here did any singing in any foreign language. Luckily I have always belted out tunes in English plus in Swedish and in Italian, too. Would have been perfectly okay to have been able to record using those languages as well.

You mentioned “exotic” – now that’s a good word to describe the stuff we did back in the day. I remember how I so tried with my limited experience to get the pizazz in the lyrics to show in the singing too.

All and all, it’s great to go down the memory lane, back to those days.

Jussi: Come the 80s synths took over the sound. At the same time your voice acquired additional depth to compensate for the lack of live instruments. The 1984 release Kuuma Heinäkuu / Hot July was already bona fide Finlando, our own take on the then happening – and now again much en vogue – Italo sound. It’s all there with the excellent synth riffs and the aural scenes of scorching hot days on the beach. Incidentally, that track was penned by your husband Jussi Niemi.

Päivi: Yes, the backing tracks were increasingly synthesized and the whole sound of disco changed. In a way it was cool but it did seem to lack that something special. I’ve been lucky to have had brilliant players in my band as I always thought it is essential to get the rhythm just right. My husband Jussi is a musican and he has naturally been seeing that the band stays in the groove.

Kuuma Heinäkuu was composed and arranged by him as you mentioned. Even though synths were used during the sessions Jussi did employ Anssi Nykänen and Harri Rantanen, in other words real drums and a bass guitar were also used. As for the arranging process, I remember the endless sounds of violins coming thru the workroom door in our house, started to get to me a bit eventually.

Jussi: What is playing at your house these days, and who do you idolize?

Päivi: I never had a single specific idol but I did sing a lot of Donna Summer to mention one. I love Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson, for example. So many fabulous bands and artists but none really all above the others!

Jussi: Thank you Päivi for this interview and – like those Swedes put it Thank You For The Music!

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